4,615 views

Moab, Fashion, Glamour, Beauty and Nude Photography Workshop

Playboy Playmate Holley Dorrough in an old mine shack in the Moab.

Event: Moab, Fashion, Glamour, Beauty & the Nude Photography Workshop
Date: 9/22-26, 2016 (Arrive on Thursday, Sept. 22nd, 2016, depart on Monday, Sept. 26th, 2016.)
Venue: Moab, Utah
Details: All previous Moab workshops sell out fast! May 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 workshops all sold-out early! June 2016 is Sold out too!
Note: This workshop is limited in size. Back by popular demand!

Interesting rock formations in the Moab make for great locations!

Interesting rock formations in the Moab make for great locations!

Ever want to get away, like to really get away from the hustle and bustle of the city and photograph five beautiful models in the Moab desert? We’ve got an exclusive deal just for you that allows you to shoot & learn.

This is also the weekend where the sun and moon set together which makes for some great astrophotography possibilities outside the workshop hours!

Fly into either Salt Lake City or Grand Junction, rent a car, prefer an SUV or 4-wheel-drive truck, and take the scenic drive down to Moab. You can fly directly into Moab, but flights are very limited. Once there, stay at our recommend hotel, or a hotel of your choice, then be prepared to shoot for two and a half solid days in the Moab environment plus a half day of photo critiques of your work. This semi-private instruction workshop is very limited in size.

If you haven’t seen my portfolio of images on RolandoGomez.com, called Moab Light, check it out now to get an idea what to expect.

Special Hot Button

This secure PayPal button below will give you an additional $1,000 off right now! This button and text will disappear soon, so act now! This is our daily special hot button! Better hurry! This button’s price is only $1499! Save $1,000 right now of the early price of $2499!




Special Hot Button

1. You must pay for your own lodging, meals and travel, we’ll provide suggestions.

2. You must be physically fit enough to walk a city block and lift 25 lbs. We will provide some lighting equipment, but don’t hesitate to bring your on camera flash if you’d like, though not required.

3. You must have the passion to photograph up to five beautiful models and patient enough for them to change into wardrobe. The type of photography is fashion, glamour, beauty and nude photography.

4. These are long days, which means late dinners along with early mornings—you will get tired by the time you have to leave, but you will treasure every moment and leave with amazing photos.

Photo from our May 2014 Moab Photography Workshop taken during the Golden Hour.

5. Camera requirements are any type of camera, preferably 35mm DSLR or SLR, medium or large format is optional. Lens focal range, from 24mm to 300mm, though a typical 70-200mm lens is all you need. A back-up drive to download your images every evening and/or laptop computer is highly recommended.

6. Professionalism is required, we’re there to capture beautiful images of beautiful models in a remote, but beautiful location. Safety is number one.

7. The cost, $2499. Use the secure, PayPal button below for payment.

We’ve used PayPal now for almost 16-years securely and you can take up to six months to pay! If you prefer a different payment method, please contact me with all your contact information including phone number and best time to call.




If you can meet the requirements and you have the passion to create some beautiful, unique images, this is the workshop for you. 2016 is a limited workshop schedule, so this is a first-come, first-serve event and due to limited photography slots, this workshop has a tighter cancellation policy (see below).

Moab Photography Workshop

Playboy Playmate Holley Dorrough at our Moab photography workshop.

Model releases for this event is $100 per model at the end of the event ($500 total for the entire event). These are mandatory releases, not optional like other workshops, paid on the last day of the event. These releases are provided and allow you to use the images for commercial use and the only restriction is prohibitions for adult related material—nudes are artistic and glamour nude only. This workshop is open to all levels, but places an emphasis that you seriously want to capture some great photos and take your photography up to the next level!

You are required to arrive no later than 7:00 p.m., local time, in the Moab on a Thursday and meet at a central location that evening, then be prepared to shoot all day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Departure is on Monday on your own or when you choose. Hotel recommendations will be provided, most hotels are close together and average from $100 to $150 per night but we have a preferred location that has a special workshop rate, but only revealed to you upon booking your workshop slot. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and lodging are not included.

Artistic, glamour and exotic nudes will be available in this location.

This semi-private instruction workshop includes personal instruction from Rolando and use of his lighting gear along with the models and make-up. You are guaranteed to produce some great images you can be proud of. Cancellation rules apply as this is a first-come, first-serve event limited to five photographers only, but more specific cancellation policies are modified to include that should you be qualified for a refund or partial refund, there will be a 30-day waiting period.

Playboy Playmate Holley Dorough in the Moab Golden Hour light.

Amazing rock formations for some great photography in the Moab.

Shot exactly as seen, the creative possibilities are endless.

Amazing images in locations scouted out in advance that are rarely photographed as these are off-road locations found through exploring.

Arizona Immigration Law, The New INS

I rarely publicly get into politics, it’s just not good business when you work for yourself to take a political side, but I’ve got to chime on this controversial Arizona immigration law—at least from an American of Latin descent observation of things. There is so much information, misinformation, debates, etc., out there where everyone is split over this new law, and that’s what bothers me the most.  If millions of people can’t come to agreement on how to interpret the law, how can an Arizona lawman be smarter than the rest of the world? And I’m just curious if all law enforcement types in Arizona have undergone specialized immigration training in how to define “reasonable suspicion” when it comes to determining if someone is an illegal alien?

According to this new state immigration law, law-enforcement officials in Arizona have the right to determine the immigration status of a person “where reasonable suspicion exists that the person is an alien who is unlawfully present in the United States.” And if that person can’t prove their status, then they “could be arrested and jailed for six months and fined $2,500.”  (Note: It’s been rumored that TMZ hopes to catch Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County at Home Depot—you know, buying saws, hammers and two-by-fours for his new expansion project.)

Now this is where I have a problem, and I’ll explain from my 47-years of being a Texan born in the good ole US of A with Latin descent.  Growing up as a kid, even with my Spanish heritage, European white-skin looks, I was often called a wetback, spick and all those racial names—in Texas. The darker-skinned Latinos would call me a Gringo and once I told them my last name, I was called a Güero. So most people when they see me don’t think I’m Latino until I introduce myself.

Then I’m asked, are you Hispanic? My first response is, “Where is the country Hispain? No, I’m of Latin descent, born in Texas, and served patriotically for over 8-years active-duty in the U.S. Army plus 8-years more as a civil service employee in the U.S. Air Force. So I tell them, “I’m an American and Texan of Latin descent.”

Right after I provide that answer, not surprisingly, I get the next dumb question, “Are you Mexican-American?” My response, “Nope, I’m an American of Latin descent.” Then I ask them, what descent are you from? Usually I’ll get German, Italian, Polish, etc., you get the picture, so then I say (matching the right descent to the person), “Are you German-American, Italian-American, Polish-American?” Get the picture?  And somehow Arizona law enforcement officers are supposed to be smarter than the Texas Rangers and the rest of the world? Don’t get me wrong, I support law enforcement but feel interpretation of the law, especially immigration law, should be left to those trained and specialized in it.  Heck, in Texas we have board certified lawyers in immigration and Spanish Land Grants.

Let me give you a better analogy, would you let a plastic surgeon do your heart transplant because both are doctors and surgeons?  Would you let a divorce lawyer represent you in a murder trial? Maybe if you were Tiger Woods or Jesse James. And you wonder why Sandra Bullock filed for divorce in Texas. Meanwhile back to the ranch.

In my opinion it seems that the Arizona legislators are targeting the “Mexicans” which sounds like racial profiling. If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, then it’s a duck!  If they are not racial profiling one specific group, then will they stop someone because they look Asian?  I’m willing to bet money, that Officer Brewer, no relation to Arizona Governor Jan Brewer, since she is Caucasian (I bet some of you thought Officer Brewer was a man), will never ask a “Caucasian” person in Scottsdale for their proof of U.S. citizenship, though that same officer would ask Juan Valdez immediately when they spot him at Starbucks ordering Columbian coffee. Though I’m wondering how many law enforcement officers in the United States realize that the term Caucasian refers to white-skinned Europeans? (Source, Wikipedia.com)

Maybe as part of the training of law enforcement in Arizona we should include something like a Coke verses Pepsi taste-test trial and place an Caucasian next to an American of Latin descent (dark-skinned) and see how many officers would pick the Caucasian out of the line-up?  God forbid if the surrounding states of Arizona pass the same law. New Mexico will have some serious problems trying to distinguish real Mexicans from new Mexicans—somehow I picture a lot of their lawmen drinking margaritas after work.  Nevada shouldn’t have any problems though if public perception is correct and Area 51 comes to life, just look for green colored skin—now that would be an irony if those green illegal aliens got pass the Arizona police and crossed into New Mexico.  Then you’d have a New Mexican Caucasian police officer calling aliens Greengos.

Going back to my military days, it’s against the law for the U.S. Military to act as “civilian” law enforcement–yes, I spent 26-months in the Latin American drug war during my soldier time in the early 90’s, so I know that law well as it was never left up to our interpretation. So if it’s against the law for a U.S. Army soldier to act as civilian law enforcement, especially immigration law, why then under Arizona law, are they allowing the local yokals–the type that can “flash their tin” to break speeding laws when off-duty, to question anyone “reasonably suspicious” when it comes to citizenship status?

Does suspicious mean the same to Officer Felipe Calderon as it would to Officer Jan Brewer? Would Officer Calderon always pick out a Caucasian and Officer Brewer a Hispanic or Asian?  Get the picture? Just like the Federal government requires it’s workforce to undergo sexual harassment and suicide prevention training, why shouldn’t Arizona require all it’s peace officers, for the sake of peace, to undergo racial profiling training? Just what does an illegal alien look like that makes them suspicious?

Bottom line–let INS do their job. Local police are already overworked and now you’re giving them immigration duties? Doesn’t make sense. The next Arizona law will give police officers the right to question anyone with a cigarette lighter because they could be an arsonist. Even President Barack Obama strongly criticized the law and is calling for Federal immigration reform—our President people.  I wonder where Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa weighs in on this, at least he had the sense to make prisoners pedal to generate electricity to power TV sets in jail.  I’m willing to bet, “America’s toughest Sheriff,” as he’s commonly referred too, is building a whole new tent city in anticipation that he’ll run out of room and the dinner menu I can assure you is not Kung Pao Chicken or enchiladas.

Well I’m in Arizona next month to conduct a photography workshop, guess I’m going to take my U.S. Passport and put it in my briefcase because if my wallet gets stolen, I could be locked up since my last name is Gomez and not McCain, thus suspicious to someone that is not Latino and doesn’t understand the Latin culture. Like Carlos Mancia would say, if you’re drinking a beer or standing outside Home Depot you have provided enough reasonable cause to look suspicious so thank goodness I drink Canadian, Crown Royal Reserve and not beer and I prefer Lowes hardware stores. Speaking of Canadians, I hope Phoenix Suns player Steve Nash (Canadian) gets pulled over (and is not carrying any identification) on the way to the U.S. Airways center tonight when they meet the San Antonio Spurs for round two of the NBA Playoffs—though I wouldn’t wish the same for Tony Parker or Manu Ginoboli.

I close by saying, let’s not go back to WWII where in Europe you had to carry papers. The Arizona immigration law is just another “persecution” of another ethnic group, which is worse than racial profiling. So I’ll agree with Arizona Governor Jan Brewer, it’s not racial profiling—it’s persecution. If there is any good news in this for Arizona, the Diamondbacks aren’t changing their name to the Yankees, probably because they got more baseballs than Arizona Tea, which is scrambling to tell the world it’s brewed and based out of New York—seriously. Just my two centavos for what it’s worth.  Thanks to reading my rambles and as I always say, let’s not forget the men and women in the military and their families as they sacrifice more to protect our freedoms than anyone in this great nation.  God Bless, Rolando

Photographing a Best Selling Author…

Well I’m not into romance novels but I was lucky enough to photograph New York Times best-selling romance author Lisa Kleypas. I shot these in 2007 originally for St. Martin’s Press for her first book with them, Sugar Daddy.

Lisa has written over 20 books in her career. The funny thing is when she first called me, I didn’t know at the time where she lived and I had insisted we first meet face-to-face before any photos would be taken as I always want to meet my clients/subjects at least a few days before a shoot. This is how you start to build rapport and learn about the inner-beauty of your subject. The outer-beauty is a always there. She agreed and I met with her and her husband.

What I didn’t know, her house, at the time, was only about 45-minutes up the road from mine. One of her biggest concerns was that she wanted to connect to her readers, mostly women and that she didn’t want anything too sexy, but at the same time something that still portrayed her beauty at her age (let’s just say very early 40’s), mother of two children and wife to a husband of many years.
[Read more…]

The Enigma of a First Time Shoot

Sometimes music and the viewing of music videos can help invigorate a model and photographer for a great shoot, especially when there is more music than words, as in the style of Enigma’s The Principals of Lust. Music also helps relax the model and photographer during their first shoot, especially if they’ve never met beforehand and their personalities are mysteries to each other.

Enigma itself is a word with Greek roots that means mysterious and ambiguous and also is used to name a machine that creates ciphers for the encryption and decryption of secret messages before and during World War II. While the machine was used commercially, as early as the 1920’s, many nations utilized the enigma machine for their government and military branches, including Nazi Germany that used the Wehrmacht Enigma Machine.

[Read more…]

Existing Light in Moab

This is first in a series of “How it Was Done” and I begin by taking you to the Moab, Utah’s Canyon Lands. While the concept of this section is to focus more on how a photograph is created, I decided for this first article I’d provide information on an entire photo shoot that created some wonderful images, rather than just one image. More of the images from the Moab Natural Light Portfolio are available for viewing in our portfolio section of this site, so here I’ll provide a couple of images and establishing shots to give an overview of the terrain and location involved for this one-hour shoot.

First, we flew three models into Utah, two to Salt Lake City, one to Grand Junction. All three I’d worked with before. The logistics to the Moab make it challenging at times, but since I had a fellow photographer and private instruction client, Brian W., who is more attune to the area, the trip was a bit easier. Brian picked one of the models up from the Grand Junction airport while I flew into Salt Lake City, where I’d pick up the other two models and the rental car.

(Two of many photos from the location, all done in one hour! For more photos, click here!)



While there is a small airport in Moab, it’s limited in what it can provide and based on prior experience, the drive from Salt Lake City, about 240 miles, is scenic and well worth the savings of flying into a major airport than a small regional airport. Grand Junction is about 120 miles and located in Colorado, limiting the airlines and flight schedules, hence I chose Salt Lake City. It’s best if flying into Salt Lake City that you arrive early enough to claim your bags, get a rental car and be able to drive while it’s daylight. Make sure you have a full tank of gas and plan on stopping half way there for a refill just as a precaution.
[Read more…]

Editorial, Commercial, Photojournalism?

I’ve been working on a new web site and today someone posted about how to distinguish the difference between editorial photography and other genres of photography, so I replied and liked it so much that I thought I’d share it here, though cleaned up from my original forum post.

First, editorial photography normally has a photojournalistic feel to it as it tells a story, often used to illustrate a concept or idea designed around the contents of a specific publication.  Photojournalism is sometimes considered a form of editorial photography, though the distinction is that photojournalism often involves a news story.

As an example, for magazine editorial photography for a publication like Zink, the photos would normally include models to illustrate their fashion, glamour and beauty theme while Better Homes and Garden would have images of someone working in their outdoor green house.

[Read more…]

Is It a Lens Barrel or a Gun Barrel?

Some will say that when 1994 Pulitzer Prize photographer Kevin Carter, 33, claimed his own life from what many believed taking one too many heartbreaking photos (particularly an image of a vulture sitting on the left of a starving Sudanese child, waiting for the child to collapse), that photography is dangerous–is it a lens barrel a gun barrel?

It all depends whom you ask. I myself have almost 30-years experience as a photographer, many of those years photographing women in my private glamour group for what I like to call Photographic Therapy so I can tell you from my own experiences, photography and war, photography is deadly if not executed properly.

What I mean by that, simply put, many photographic therapy clients come from my private shoots. They are usually women with almost 15-years of marriage under their belt, many unhappy with their belt size that age and child bearing years have brought them. Most are looking for a spark or sizzle as an insurance policy to sustain their marriage, through sexy photos. [Read more…]